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In the first installment of our clothing production series, we covered the initial steps of the clothing production line. Of course, there are many more crucial factors that need time and attention to ensure quality products. 

In our first installment, we discussed sourcing materials, adjusting those materials, and creating patterns and samples. Here is the second installment in our guide to break down the production steps.

Review Samples

Once your samples have been produced and created, it’s time to review. This is the time to make any and all adjustments to fabric and sizing if things aren’t looking the way you envisioned. Also check your garments for durability and quality, making sure all the seams are sturdy and neat. It can also be helpful to wash your samples to see how they will react to a standard washing machine. Customer happiness is key!

Mass Manufacturing

Now that you have your materials ready to go, your grades inputted, and are happy with your samples, it’s time for mass production! Typically, average production time is 3 months but varies heavily depending on the quantity and quality of the garments being created.

One of the most important steps in the entire clothing production process is quality control. It’s easy to think that you can simply trust the machines and computers at work, but it’s crucial to add a human inspection to the mix as well. This can be completed on a monthly basis, or in a time frame that works best for you and the manufacturer. If there are any reject garments, this is the time to discuss with your entire team to make sure all bases are covered. 

Shipment

The shipping aspect of the production process is typically handled by your chosen manufacturer. Manufacturing companies often make business deals with prominent shipping companies to lower costs for shipment exclusivity. This takes care of the element of insurance as well, as that responsibility automatically included when using FedEx or UPS. Your items will then be distributed to potential showrooms, customers, and lined up retailers.